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lucha libre, Lucha Libre Volcánica, Mexican wrestling, Professional Wrestling, Washington, wrestling school

All Politics is Local III: Back at the Capital

As some of you may remember from last year, myself and other local performers took to the capital in attempt to change Washington’s strict regulations on pro wrestling. Because many of you asked about the legislation, and it’s a consistent inquiry from colleagues and fans, I thought I’d share a recent statement I gave to Seattlish.

Lucha Libre Volcánica was established in 2011 as the premier lucha libre company and training school in the Pacific Northwest. Since our inception, we’ve had a successful training school, and have performed for regional festivals such as Seattle’s Taco Truck Rodeo, to our own annual show scholarship fundraising show at the University of Puget Sound.

Theatrical pro wrestling has innate hazards like any other athletic endeavor. Accordingly we’ve always emphasized proper technique, safety, and protection amongst our students and performers. Unlike athletic competition, the competition in lucha libre is more akin to theatre—it’s an intellectual and performative competition. Our acrobatics almost always require cooperation between two or more individuals, an essential characteristic that both pro wrestling and lucha libre share. Because of this important distinction between combative sports and pro wrestling, the regulations that have hitherto hindered any development of a pro wrestling scene in Washington are superfluous, and horribly misguided—they demonstrate a fundamental misunderstanding of pro wrestling.

Fortunately a handful of active supporters managed to gain attention of the Washington State Reps and the DOL, both of whom agreed that the regulations are constrictive, not constructive. Through a series of meetings with the DOL, 3-2-1 Battle’s Josh Black, local performer Jake Stratton, and Lucha Libre Volcánica’s Michael Leveton and owner José Gómez have been able to shape a series of regulations that will hopefully cultivate an active pro wrestling scene in Washington State. While we have been actively petitioning our State Reps, the DOL’s cooperation has been integral to any victories pro wrestling has won in Washington.

Hitherto the regulations have been cost-prohibitive, particularly for small family-owned companies like LLV. Paying for performers, a venue, and promotional materials is already an assumed cost. However the previous regulations would hold that a promoter would also have pay for the following: ringside security; an ambulance and an EMT on site; a promoter’s license; $1 from each ticket sale to the DOL; 10% of the overall door to the DOL. While some companies like the WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment) may be able to afford these costs, the average promoter cannot. Furthermore these costs deter any would-be trainers from operating a training facility school, as the performance opportunities are scarce.

HB 2388, in conjunction with the changes made with the DOL, will create and incentive for wrestling companies to operate in Washington by removing some of the restrictive and costly regulations imposed upon promoters, owners, and performers. By doing so, we hope not only to create a opportunities for touring companies such as Lucha Libre USA and WWE to visit Washington, but also for small business entrepreneurs such as LLV’s José Gómez.

Further, because of the current restrictions many companies end up hosting guerilla shows and operating underground training facilities. The removal of the regulations will attract professional companies, sincere entrepreneurs, and higher-quality performers, thereby increasing the legitimacy of the professional wrestling scene in Washington. Such competition will increase the accountability of self-described (read: hack) “trainers,” and therefore both the safety of performers and the quality of performances.

With the (hopeful) passing of HB 2388 and the less restrictive DOL regulations, we’re hoping to build a better and more robust pro wrestling scene in Washington State.

lucha libre, Lucha Underground, Professional Wrestling, training

A Luchador’s Workout: Break it All (Bonus: Death Match 2015!)

The quarterly workout update is back!

To those who follow the workout updates, I apologize for missing the first quarterly update of 2015. This occurred for two reasons: one, I spent two weeks in Mexico City training, which due to the increased training load, my workouts were slightly more sporadic and irregular in their intensity and workload; two, due to the increased number of performance opportunities early this year (including 3 dates already this year, and 3 more dates in the first week of May alone!), I’ve had trouble pinning down a workout that will continue to build strength and endurance without sacrificing my in-ring training stamina. While I think that I have constructed a regimen that will satisfy the former, this week will be a test-run to see if I need to make any adjustments regarding the latter.

On the note of shows—which I’ll write more about at length at a later date—I am happy and honored to say that I performed in Death Match 2015 alongside former WWE stars Cryme Tyme, & Ezekiel Jackson (now known as Big Ryck on Lucha Underground), as well as Lucha Underground talents Mariachi Loco, Willie Mack, Little Cholo, and Famous B, amongst others. La Avispa, Gringo Loco, Guerrero Aguila and myself were ecstatic to be a part of the show. I can’t thank Ryck enough for the opportunity, and for being so remarkable friendly and accessible. I also want to give a huge shoutout to Josh Black (of Seattle’s 3-2-1 Battle fame), for connecting me to Ryck for the event.

As per usual, the workout is listed below, and I’ve attached a spreadsheet in case you want to sing along.

Weekly Overview

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Lucha training X X Training X Training X Training
Weight training Legs X X Push X Pull X
Cardio/plyometrics/agility Box jumps, 3×2@max height Swimming Sprints X Sprints Sprints X
Core exercises Balance X X Low rep/high weight X High rep/no weight X
Neck 3×3, 10-15 reps X X X X X X

Weight regimen

Sunday

Squats (4×12, 1×3 heavy)
Dead lift (4×10, 1x max)
Kettlebell swings (4×12-15)
Leg Press (4×15)
Step ups (4×10)
Calf raises (4×6)

Wednesday

Pull-ups (4×10)
Chin-ups (3×10)
Bent-over row (3×10, 2x max)
Reverse flies (4×10)
High pull (4×10)
Hammer curls (4×6)
Bicep curls (4×6)
Shrugs (4×6)

Friday

Bench press (4×10, 1x max)
Weighted dips (4×10)
Incline press (4×10, 1x max)
Chest flies (4×8)
Front/rear/side deltoid isos (3×10)
Tricep isolations (4×6)
Jammer press (4×8)

Circuit Guide

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Cardio/plyometrics/agility X Swimming ~ 20 minutes 1:2 interval sprints, 5x sprints Ladder drills 1:2 interval sprints, 5x sprints 1:2 interval sprints, 2x sprints, 1x 2 minute sprint
Core exercises 3 exercises (abs), 2 exercses (obliques) 2 sets of each exercise X X 3 exercises (abs), 2 exercses (obliques) 2 sets of each exercise X 3 exercises (abs), 2 exercses (obliques) 2 sets of each exercise
Neck 3×3, 10-15 reps X X X X X