Lucha libre workout
arena mexico, exercise, lucha libre, Mexican wrestling, Professional Wrestling, strength, training

Lucha Libre Workout: The Mexico Regimen

It’s been a while since I’ve shared a workout. Since the my last published workout, I’ve done both heavy and hypertrophy regimens, both of which were built around my training and show schedules. For example, when I was only training on Saturday and/or Sunday and doing shows on Friday and Saturday, I could work a muscle group to complete exhaustion Monday through Wednesday and still have time to recover. Although I’ve got back to heavier lifting days, I carried over one particular element from my pervious hypertrophy program: tempo lifts. After 12 weeks of assorted hypertrophy exercises at various tempos, I not only saw muscle growth, but slowing down my lifts also made me more conscious of my range of movement and thus a better lifter. 

Now that I’m in Mexico Citythe Mecca of lucha libre—I’ve adapted my lifting program to my rather-busy lucha training schedule. To reflect the entirety of my week, I’ve included both lifting and lucha days in my training overview. Below you’ll find said overview, and a preview of the workout. Because this program was written by La Avispa—who is an ACSM Certified Personal Trainer with a Bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science—it is subject to patronage of her Patreon. If you want full access to this workout, new workout plans, and other cool shit, check out her Patreon for more deets.

Note about neck exercises: I learned this simple, three-way neck exercise regimen from CMLL Profesor Tony Salazar. It’s a means through which to safely strengthen your neck without the potential for spinal compression—a problem that traditional neck bridges can often cause. Essentially, there are three basic movements: nodding “yes,” shaking your head “no”, and a circular motion. The workout is as follows:

  • Lay on your back in crunch position, with your knees up, feet tucked near your bum. 
  • Once you start, do not rest your head on the floor until after you have completed all reps from all three exercises. That means once you start, you will not rest until you’ve done all. Of. The. Reps. 
  • Lift your neck about 1-2 inches from the floor.
  • In a controlled manner, nod your head “yes” 20 times. 
  • After completing 20 reps, shake your head “no” 20 times. Again, do not touch your head to the floor between reps, nor after you complete all 20 reps.
  • After completing 20 reps, move your head in a circular motion to the right. STILL Don’t touch rest head to the floor—you’re almost done. 
  • After 20 reps, move your head in a circular motion to the left. Once you finish all 20 reps, you can rest your head on the ground. 

Depending on your current neck strength, you can add reps as needed. I was advised to perform the exercise at least twice per week, and to add 10 reps to each exercise every two weeks (meaning +10 to “yes,” +10 to “no”, +10 to circles to the right, +10 for circles to the left for a total of 40 additional reps) until you hit 50 of each. Adjust accordingly, but 20 reps of each should be an easy baseline for anyone who fancies them self a pro wrestler. 

Now to the workout: 

Monday: 

  • Horizontal push & pull exercises 
  • Weighted ab exercise 
  • Neck exercises 

Tuesday: 

  • Lucha libre (~2 hours high-impact, interval-based cardio)

Wednesday:

  • Fasted HIIT exercises (10 rounds @ 15 secs, 1 minute rest between intervals) 
  • Vertical push & pull exercises 
  • Weighted ab exercises 
  • Neck exercises 

Thursday: 

  • Lucha libre (~2 hours of high-impact, interval-based cardio)

Friday:

  • Squats, deadlift, misc legs 
  • Weighted ab exercises 
  • Neck exercises 
  • Lucha libre (~2 hours low-impact chain wrestling) 

Saturday & Sunday: rest and/or perform 

 

As promised, here’s a snippet of the first three exercises for Friday:

Lucha libre workout

What’s your current workout plan? Interested in seeing the whole program? Hit up my comments and let’s chat.

 

academic, Cultural Studies, lucha libre, masculinity, Mexican wrestling, Professional Wrestling

The Big Comeback (Post)

I can’t stay away.

There, I said it.

No apologies, no profound reasons: there was no magical moment wherein I realized that I wanted to continue writing about pro wrestling.

Well, maybe. There was one particular interaction with a fellow luchador which reminded me that my work is not done.

In the wake of Richard Spencer’s well-deserved punching, I came across a shirt that read “Punch More Nazis.” I had one printed for myself to wear during and upcoming show, and attempted to rally the rest of my colleagues at Lucha Libre Volcánica to follow suit. Sónico, the other half of Los Sexi Mexis, responded by stating that “we’re luchadors; not activists.”

Sónico’s argument is perhaps not inaccurate. However it presupposes that professional wrestling is completely devoid of political significance. Assuming that wrestling was somehow completely isolated from the realm of politics, I may have conceded. However, knowing that professional wrestling is thoroughly steeped in ideology, I continued with my original plan to wear the shirt. Our exchange did remind me that I still have work to complete in this realm.

Accordingly, I am compelled to again write about pro wrestling. Within the next week I intend share a proposed outline and itinerary for completing this project. It is admittedly an ambitious one, and incredibly multifaceted. As is customary for my approach, I will address professional wrestling in a critical academic fashion. However, in order to make the topic accessible as well as to offer a thorough exploration, I will utilize a multimedia approach that will include images, video, and audio, in addition to writing. The aforementioned approach ensures that each post will be unique, but also that completing each one will be no small task. Consequently, I may not be able to provide weekly updates, save for the occasional unrelated musings.

As previously stated, this will only be a pure “wrestling blog” in that it will be demonstrably using examples from wrestling for argumentative purposes. That is to say I will be writing about wrestling in an academic sense, but I will not be “chronicling” the history of wrestling, writing about my own wrestling adventures, nor providing fan insights like a damned mark.

It has been a while, but I’m stoked to be back. 🙌🏽

Image source: http://www.vivelohoy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/santoyblue1.jpg
academic, art, Cultural Studies, culture, lucha, lucha libre, masculinity, Mexican wrestling, observations, performance, Performance Art, school, school of lucha libre, training, wrestling school

It’s Complicated: Relationships In and Out of the Ring


Social complexity is at the very foundation of lucha libre, wherein partners and rivals, enemies and friends, are often one in the same. The fact that rudos and technicos may not actually hate each other is not revelatory. However the relationships between luchadors both in and out of the ring are significantly more complicated than many realize: the kinetic energy that ignites between two clashing luchadors is not only a mutual desire to create an exemplary show, but is also an overflow of tension from by the friendship/competition dynamic that is an innate quality of the sport.

Continue reading “It’s Complicated: Relationships In and Out of the Ring”